Now reading: The Legend of Huma

legendofhumaHaving finished some of the “newer” Dragonlance novels, I have decided to return to one of the classics, The Legend of Huma. In the past I have always read this novel after Chronicles and Legends, but this time around I am avoiding the two original trilogies in order to focus on the “peripheral” stories. I have always found Richard A. Knaak to be one of the best Dragonlance writers and this one is in my opinion of the best ever written. I mean think about the characters: Huma, Magius, Kaz, Crynus and of course the renegade mastermage Galan Dracos. Furthermore we meet some ultimate dragons like Charr and Wyrmfather not to mention a young Cyan Bloodbane What’s not to like?

From a gaming perspective there’s a ton of material that can be turned into some really exciting content. Unfortunately no one ever did. So be it. We still have a really good novel, which I have read several times and probably will read several more times.

Dragons of a vanished moon

I finished Dragons of a vanished moon the other day. This is the second time I have read that book, and strangely enough, I liked much better the second time around. I think it’s because I rushed through the first time I read it. Back in the day, I just wanted to get through it and get to the part where the gods return. This time it was much more enjoyable to just enjoy the story and follow the progress.

Having finished the War of Souls trilogy, I am still left with a weird feeling. Call me old fashioned, but I never really understood the change that the Age of Mortals brought. The whole Chaos aspect of the pantheon always seemed very out of place or perhaps a bit rushed, and that makes the story a little abrupt for me. On the other hand one could argue that Dragonlance really had nowhere to go after the Legends since the stories were so powerful. However, I still think it was a good time to move the setting forward. Anyway, killing of some gods and changing pretty much everything about the setting certainly changed that. The Dragonlance we saw right before the setting died was much darker and grittier than we had ever seen.

In many ways, the setting was left much more interesting than before and from that perspective, the Age of Mortals was a good thing. It ensured that Dragonlance left a beautiful looking corpse.

Dragons of a Lost Star

In my quest to re-read the War of Souls trilogy I have now come to the second installment, Dragons of a Lost Star. Actually I am half way done with it but still. Anyway, as I updated the blog header it hit me that I should have started with Dragons of Summer Flame to get the whole back story again. However, Summer Flame always depresses me, which is probably the reason why I have never read it more than once.

I am really enjoying Lost Star, so perhaps my impression of the Age of Mortals clouded my judgment back in the day. It’s too bad we will never see another Dragonlance novel, but at least we have a lot old ones to read.

Reading again

Oh, how I have missed reading. It’s like massage for my brain.

So, I am reading the War of Souls trilogy again. While reading the Minotaur Wars I felt like reading War of Souls, to see if I still felt the same way about it as the last time. I was never a fan of what was done to Dragonlance setting during the 5th Age and Summer of Flame, but maybe the years away from Dragonlance would give a new appreciation of this age. Let’s see.

I have only read a couple of chapters and I already dislike Silvan, perhaps more than the first time I read Dragons of Summer Flame. But, it is still nice to be back on Krynn. 

Winter is almost over

And I have decided to stop whining. Well, it’s a little bit more complicated than that actually.

I was reading a thread on the Dragonlance Forum, where people were talking about how they’ve stopped reading. Either they didn’t have the time, or they were unable to stay focused because they had lost the ability to concentrate on reading. This was mostly due to the use of social networks.

So anyway, I have not read for a long time, and I was beginning to fear that I lost the ability to read anything that wasn’t work related. When reading the newspaper on my way to work, I found myself skipping through the articles, which seemed to support my suspicion.

Last weekend the wife and I talked about getting rid of the desk in our living room and instead make a reading corner with bookshelves, chairs etc. So, to check what damage the Internet had done to my brain I went to the shed and got out the first book in the pile: Night of Blood.

Well, a week later I have finished the book, and it turned out I had no problem whatsoever focusing on reading. I even shut off the phone and the PC and just read. That was freedom – complete freedom in my mind.

So, now I will bring in all my books and reread them like there is no tomorrow, because I just realized how much I miss reading and how much I detest constant notifications on my phone.

Getting the elven itch

513RP8SYGCL__BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU02_I have been reading the Elven Nations trilogy for a couple of days now, and I am really enjoying it so far. Actually, I am enjoying it so much that I am considering buying The Elven Exiles trilogy.

I always felt the elves in Dragonlance were portrayed as being terribly weak and passive, but it seems like they are portrayed a little differently here. Of course, the books are all about elves, so it makes sense that they are better described, and therefore a lot more interesting than what we normally see in the books.

Currently reading: JRR Tolkien

So, I finally found the time to catch up on my reading, and my first book this summer is The Children of Hurin by J.R.R Tolkien.

The book has been edited by Tolkien’s son, since the author himself never finished it, however, that Tolkien feel is definitely there.

The book takes place during the Morgoth days and follows primarily Turin the son of Hurin and his life from cradle to the grave. I don’t want to give any spoilers, so you will just have to go read it yourself.

The book is quite dark and has some pretty horrendous aspects that rival that of the most know Greek tragedies, however, it is rather nice to be back in Tolkien’s Middleearth once again among orcs, elves and dragons.

The Children of Hurin